1. Get the lay of the land: spend a good deal of time reading everything you need to know about your new position and all of its facets. Walk into every space in which you will provide leadership, and get your “noticer” on with keen observations.
  2. Relationship-build with key constituents. Set appointments with everyone with whom you will interact on a weekly basis–Management, direct reports, inter-departmental colleagues, vendors, top customers, even the custodian and receptionist! Ask questions to get to know them and listen for how you can serve them best.
  3. Be a climate-creator. Your team will be watching you from the get-go to see what kind of leader you are and what changes you will bring to the culture. Be very intentional about forming then articulating your vision for your high expectations in how your team must treat one another as you give superior customer service together. Model it consistently every day, and reward what you want repeated.
  4. Remove obstacles for teammates. Find out what each person has been struggling with before your arrived in your position, and take assertive action to clear the path for them to succeed. That one action of empowerment will give you favor in their eyes.
  5. Be a can-do problem-solver. It’s possible that the person you replaced passively let some negative situations fester by not addressing them. Your team wants a leader of action and will respect your efforts to look for ways to wrestle dilemmas to the ground.
  6. Identify what needs the most attention. Leaders are focusers. After a few months of Managing By Wandering Around (MBWA) and listening, you will see the priorities rise to the forefront–where you need to engage task forces to fix problems, or where you need to get your hands dirty in leading the charge toward resolution. Shift resources to tackle the biggest issues.
  7. Set up effective systems. Often the biggest performance gaps remain where there aren’t clear procedures/checklists that better assure successful outcomes. Accountability and feedback systems are paramount for great communication and closed loops.

Now you’re cooking! You are going to rock this new position and make quite the impact on those in your sphere of influence. You never get a second chance at a first impression–so keep being intentional in all you do. For some coaching on maximizing your first 90 days and beyond, let’s do a free coaching session. pcgrowingforward@gmail.com to book me.