1. Improve specific skills: you will have to get better at what you do (working smarter, not harder) since you have less
    time to do it. Enroll in training that can sharpen your skills, or find a mentor in a specific skill who is doing it with excellence to train you.
  2. Set boundaries: You only have so much bandwidth; thus, you must only say YES to what you can realistically accomplish in the time allotted. Get more resolve with your NO by having a polite-but-firm go-to statement that declines extra responsibilities. This also promotes your self-care by preventing workaholism and keeping your non-work priorities balanced.
  3. Stay in your strength zone: Since you cannot do everything, figure out with your supervisor in what areas you add the most value to the organization–and spend 80% of your time/focus on these tasks. It will feel like doubling your output when “weaker tasks” fall away.
  4. Get incredibly organized: work with a coach or develop systems that allow you to stay on track. Make your calendar and email and task manager systems as efficient as possible. Have “homes” for all papers/files/supplies. You may need to get to ground-zero with catch-up on a weekend in order to begin these systems with strength.
  5. Triage tasks. Your to-do list is too long to accomplish every day; so, you need a method for what tasks have the most significance for THIS day. Urgency/importance ranking is often the filter to run task through, in order to pick out the “big 3” for each day–giving more credence to “importance” whenever possible because of its long-term benefits.
  6. Use available resources. When you are moving so fast, you may overlook people/tools that can lighten your load. Who can you delegate or outsource to? What app or computer program could automate an annoying task? Who can you hang out with once a month, to use a sounding board for getting better?